Principle

The User Interface Extension features one of the fastest graphical engines, associated with a unique int-based event management system. It provides [MUI] library implementation. The following diagram depicts the components involved in its design, along with the provided tools:

The User Interface Extension Components along with a Platform

The User Interface Extension Components along with a Platform

The diagram below shows a simplified view of the components involved in the provisioning of a Java user interface.

Overview

Overview

Stacks are the native parts of MicroUI. They connect the MicroUI library to the user-supplied drivers code (coded in C).

Drivers for input devices must generate events that are sent, via a MicroUI Event Generator, to the MicroEJ Application. An event generator accepts notifications from devices, and generates an event in a standard format that can be handled by the application. Depending on the MicroUI configuration, there can be several different types of event generator in the system, and one or more instances of each type. Each instance has an unique id.

Drivers may either interface directly with event generators, or they can send their notifications to a Listener, also written in C, and the listener passes the notifications to the event generator. This decoupling has two major benefits:

  • The drivers are isolated from the MicroEJ libraries – they can even be existing code.
  • The listener can translate the notification; so, for example, a joystick could generate pointer events.

For the MicroEJ Simulator, the platform is supplied with a set of software widgets that generically support a range of input devices, such as buttons, joysticks and touchscreens, and output devices such as pixelated displays and LEDs. With the help of the Front Panel Designer tool that forms part of the MicroEJ Workbench the user must define a front panel mock-up using these widgets. The user must provide a set of listeners that connects the input widgets to event generators. The user may choose to simulate events that will ultimately come from a special-purpose input device using one of the standard input widgets; the listener will do the necessary translation. The user must also supply, in Java, a display extension that adapts the supplied display widget to the specifics of the hardware being simulated.